Collateralized shadow banking: still at risk of fire sales

A few basic points about shadow banking ten years after the crisis:

“What shadow banking is” isn’t very complicated if banking is defined as “borrowing short to lend long”

What makes banks unstable is that their liabilities are on demand (i.e. they borrow short) while their assets pay out only over the course of years (i.e. they lend long). A principle reason that we are worried about “shadow” banks is that they have the same instability as banks, but lack the protections in the form of a strict regulatory regime and a lender of last resort. When shadow banks have this instability it is because they borrow short to lend long.

This approach makes it easy to understand the world of shadow banking, because there are only a limited number of financial instruments that are used to borrow on a short-term basis. Thus, for the most part shadow banks have to finance themselves on the commercial paper market (unsecured financing) or on the repo market (secured financing) or, especially for investment banks, via derivatives collateral (e.g. that is posted by prime brokerage clients). These are the major sources of wholesale short-term funding.

So typically when a financial product is subject to losses due to a run-prone (and therefore classified as a shadow bank), it’s because of the product’s relationship to the commercial paper market, to the repo market, and/or to the derivatives market.* The latter two, which comprise the collateralized segment of shadow banking, are the most complicated, because the run can come from many different directions: that is, lenders may stop lending (e.g. Lehman Bros), borrowers who post collateral may stop posting collateral (e.g. novation at Bear Stearns), and for derivatives contracts conditions may shift so that suddenly collateral posting requirements increase (e.g. AIG).

Collateralized shadow banking is governed by ISDA protocols and contracts, not the traditional law governing debt

While repos have been around for centuries, a “repo market” in which anyone can participate and where collateral other than government debt is posted is a relatively new phenomenon. Similarly derivatives contracts have been subject to margin requirements for more than a century, but in the past these contracts were exchange-traded and exchanges set the rules both for margin and for eligibility to trade on the exchange.

Thus, what made repo and derivatives financially innovative in the 1980s and 1990s was that suddenly there were unregulated over the counter (OTC) markets in them. What “unregulated” really meant, however, was that the big banks wrote the rules for this market themselves in the form of International Swaps and Derivatives Association (ISDA) protocols and contracts.

In the early days of repo and derivatives it was far from clear that they wouldn’t fall under the existing regulatory regime as securities (regulated by the SEC), or as commodities and/or futures (regulated by the CFTC). (The legal definitions of the SEC’s and the CFTC’s jurisdiction was deliberately made very broad in the implementing legislation, so an intuitive understanding of these terms will not coincide with their legal definitions.) Similarly, it was far from clear that the collateral posted in these OTC contracts would not be subject to the standard terms in the bankruptcy code governing collateralized debt. (Kettering who describes repos in this era as too big to fail products is great on this.)

Thus, one of the ISDA’s first projects was lobbying in the US for exceptions to the existing regulatory regime. Progress was incremental, but a long series of legislative amendments to the financial regulatory regime starting in 1982 and culminating in the bankruptcy reform act of 2005 effectively placed the whole system of repo and margin collateral outside the financial regulatory regime that had been set up in the 1930s and 1940s (for details see here, or ungated). These reforms also exempted these contracts from the bankruptcy code’s protections for debtors (see here or ungated).

Where the US led others followed. Gabor (2016) documents how Germany and Britain came to adopt the US model of collateralized lending, despite the central banks’ serious reservations about the system’s implications for financial stability. The world economy entered into 2008 with repo and derivatives markets effectively subject only to the private “regulation” of ISDA protocols and contracts.

Despite reforms, the instability at the heart of the collateralized shadow banking system has yet to be addressed

We saw in 2008 how the collateralized shadow banking system relies extremely heavily on the central bank for stability. (Federal Reserve programs to support the repo market included the TSLF and the PDCF.  Data released by the Fed indicates that at the peak of the crisis it accepted substantial amounts of very risky collateral.)

Indeed the International Capital Markets Association has put it quite bluntly that it considers the systemic risk associated with fire sales in repo and derivatives markets to be a problem that “the authorities” are expected to step in and address.

“The question is how to mitigate such systemic liquidity risk. We believe that systemic risks require systemic responses. In this case, the authorities can be expected to intervene as lenders of last resort to ensure the liquidity of the system as a whole. For their part, market users should be expected to remain creditworthy and to have liquidity buffers sufficient to sustain themselves until official intervention restores sufficient liquidity to obviate the need for fire sales.”

In short, the collateralized shadow banking system is constructed on the expectation of a “Fed put”. Instead of attempting to build a robust infrastructure of debt, shadow banking embraces the risk of fire sales and expects the governments that don’t make the shadow banking rules to bail it out.

The only sure-fire way to eliminate the risk of fire sales is to reduce the financial system’s reliance on repo- and margin-type contracts that allow a decline in the value of collateral to be a trigger for demanding additional funds. Based on financial market history this would almost certainly require an increase in the use of unsecured interbank debt markets. However, not much progress has been made on this front, especially since the EU’s proposed Financial Transactions Tax stalled in 2015.

On the other hand, significant reforms have been made since 2008 (Please let me know if I’ve left out anything important.) :

  • Collateral has shifted mostly to sovereign debt. This helps stabilize the market, but perhaps only temporarily as a broad range of collateral is still officially acceptable (so deterioration of the quality of collateral can creep in).
  • Approximately 50% of derivatives now are held with central counterparties. (The estimate is based on a 2015 BIS report.) This reduces the risk that the failure of a small market participant sets off a chain of failures that results in a fire sale. There is some concern however that fire sale risk has been transformed into the risk of a failure of a central counterparty.
  • Derivatives are now officially regulated by either the CFTC or the SEC and and there has been an effort to harmonize OTC margining requirements internationally.
  • Under pressure from regulators a voluntary stay protocol has been developed by the ISDA that is designed to work with the regulators’ special resolution regimes and to limit the right to terminate a contract due the default of a related entity. In the US systemically important banks are required to include this protocol in their OTC derivatives contracts.
  • Bank liquidity regulations have been adopted that limit the degree to which regulated banks are exposed to significant risk in these markets.

Notice that these new regulations embrace the basic framework of collateralized shadow banking: much of the focus is on making sure that enough collateral is being used. Special rules are designed to protect the largest banks and the banking system more generally. But aside from protecting the banks, it’s not clear that significant measures have been taken to eliminate the risk of fire sales that originate outside the banking system. Assuming that these regulations are effective at protecting the banks, this raises the question: Who bears the fire sale risk in this new environment?

Thanks to @kiffmeister for requesting that I write up this blogpost.

* While one can usually figure this out after the run has occurred, current regulation does not necessarily make the relevant information available before a run has occurred. Mutual funds are a case in point: the vast majority of them have so little exposure to repo and derivatives markets that it can be ignored, but the few that take on significant risk may have disclosures that are hard to distinguish ex ante from the ones that don’t (e.g. Oppenheimer Core Bond Fund in 2008).

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