The dismantling of the economy’s legal infrastructure II: Investment funds

From the beginning there was a “private offering exemption” to both the disclosure requirements of the Securities Act of 1933 (“’33 Act”) and the investment company registration requirement of the Investment Company Act of 1940 (“’40 Act”). The basic idea behind ’33 Act and the ’40 Act exemptions were somewhat different, however. For the ’40 Act if an issuer’s activities were sufficiently small and didn’t involve marketing to the public they didn’t need to be covered. For the ’33 Act the focus was on the fact that certain financial professionals, such as banks, as well as the principals of a corporation did not need the protection of the disclosure requirements.

Thus, the original ‘40 Act had the “section 3(c)(1)” exemption for funds “that are beneficially owned by not more than 100 persons” and that issue securities that are not offered publicly. Companies that were required to register under the ’40 Act faced leverage restrictions and controls on self-dealing amongst other requirements. Until 1996, a private fund that sought to opt out of the ’40 Act had to fall under the 100 investor exemption. Obviously, this constrained the size of any given hedge fund or private equity fund.

Similarly, the original ’33 Act had the Section 4(a)(2) exemption from the disclosure requirements for “transactions not involving any public offering.” From the earliest days, this was understood to exempt corporate activities such as obtaining bank loans, placing securities privately with institutions, and promoting a business endeavor amongst a small group of closely related individuals (SEC 2015: 11). This approach was affirmed by the Supreme Court in 1953 which interpreted a non-public offering to include “an offering to those who are shown to be able to fend for themselves” and found that an offering to corporate executives “who, because of their position, have access to the same kind of information that the Securities Act would make available in the form of a registration statement” could also fall within the exemption.[1]

In short, for the first decades of this comprehensive regulatory regime, the private offering exemption was narrow, and offered little or no scope for hedge funds to operate. Needless to say, the financial industry pushed continuously to widen the scope of the exemption.

The process by which hedge funds were allowed to grow started slowly when in 1974 the SEC adopted Rule 146 which stated that the Section 4(a)(2) exemption would apply to offerings with no more than 35 purchasers, with dissemination of information comparable to a registration statement, and “reasonable belief” that purchasers or their representatives had the capacity to evaluate the information.[2] The Rule allowed sales to purchasers who couldn’t evaluate the information themselves, but instead (i) were wealthy enough to bear the risks associated with the security, and (ii) had a representative with the capacity to evaluate the information, thus creating an investment category specifically for wealthy individuals. At the same time in the Adopting Release the Commission declared:

“[I]t is frequently asserted that wealthy persons and certain other persons such as lawyers, accountants and businessmen are “sophisticated” investors who do not need the protections afforded by the Act. It is the Commission’s view that “sophistication” is not a substitute for access to the same type of information that registration would provide.” (SEC Rule 146 Adopting Release No. 33-5487, 39 FR 15621)

In short, the ’33 Act’s goal of investor protection meant that regulation had to ensure that even sophisticated investors received the relevant information to evaluate. On the other hand, the rule imposed no constraint on the amount of money that could be raised from those 35 investors.

A year later Rule 240 was adopted to benefit small businesses by exempting issuers raising less than $100,000 in a 12 month period with no general advertising, and with no more than 100 investors. Notably, the requirement that investors have access to information comparable to a registration statement was omitted from this Rule, presumably in order to reduce the costs and legal risks faced by small businesses.

The pressure for broader exemptions continued and was met in 1980 with Rule 242, which was the first time the concept of an “accredited investor” was used. An “accredited investor” included categories that had long been covered by the 4(a)(2) exemption including banks, institutional investors, and directors and executives of the issuer. Added to these groups were pension funds (explicitly), and anyone who purchased $150,000 of the issuer’s securities. And this rule no longer required that the investor be furnished with information “based on the assumption that accredited persons were in a position to ask for and obtain the information they believed was relevant” (SEC 2015: 14). In short, Rule 242 blew a hole in the comprehensive regulatory regime, but was designed to harm only those wealthy and institutional investors that happened to lack the financial acumen the SEC attributed to them.

A few months later in the Small Business Investment Incentive Act of 1980 (Pub.L. 96-477) the concept of “accredited investor” was made law. The legislation (i) defined the term to include the broad categories of financial intermediaries covered by Rule 242 while authorizing the SEC to adopt additional categories and (ii) created a new exemption for issues of up to $5 million to accredited investors only (SEC 2015: 15).

Just two years later, the SEC replaced all of these refinements of the private offering exemptions with a single regulation, Regulation D. Regulation D was organized around the concept of the “accredited investor” and at the same time widened its scope. In addition to those covered by Rule 242 were added anyone with substantial net worth ($1 million)[3] or income ($200,000 per annum), and any entity all of whose owners were accredited investors. At the same time the SEC explained that purpose of this redefinition was to define a class of investors who did not need the ’33 Act’s protections, because of their sophistication, ability to sustain loss, or ability to fend for themselves (SEC 2015: 17).[4]

Reg D significantly revised the three categories of exempt issues: Rule 504 exempted the sale of up to $500,000 without general solicitation (imposing no limitations on number or type of investors). Rule 505 exempted the sale of up to $5 milllion in a 12 month period to an unlimited number of accredited investors and 35 additional persons without general solicitation. Rule 506 dramatically broadened the Rule 146 safe harbor by treating as private offerings sales of unlimited amounts of securities to an unlimited number of accredited investors and up to 35 non-accredited, but sophisticated, investors without general solicitation. Although Rule 506 was viewed as a replacement for Rule 146, by allowing unlimited amounts to be raised from an unlimited number of investors, it was different in character from the original Rule 146. In addition, Rule 506 eliminated entirely the requirement for accredited investors that they be furnished with or have access to information comparable to a registration statement.

Observe the structure of this change. It would have been very hard for the SEC to argue that the Regulation D exemptions were consistent with the legislature’s intent in enacting the ’33 Act, because in 1933 the primary purpose was to protect investors by addressing the problem of information asymmetry in the market and there was no intent to exempt wealthy individuals or pension beneficiaries (through their fiduciaries) from that protection. This was clear in in 1974 when Rule 146 was adopted. But, with the passage of the Small Business Investment Incentive Act of 1980 the relevant intent when discussing an “accredited investor” was that of the 1980 legislature – and the stated intent of that legislature was to increase the ability of “small business” to raise capital. Thus, the adopting release for Regulation D states that its purpose is to “facilitate capital formation consistent with the protection of investors” and the emphasis throughout the release is on small business.[5] Hedge funds and leveraged buyout companies were small businesses – not just from an employment perspective, but at the time in terms of their capacity to raise funds too. The latter was, however, due to the constraints imposed by the regulatory regime, as would become clear after those constraints were relaxed.

To summarize, the 1980 law opened the door to a 180 degree shift in the focus of the ’33 Act from the goal of protecting the beneficial owners of securities to the goal of making it easier for “small businesses” to raise vast amounts of money. And Regulation D threw that door wide open by eliminating the constraints that were designed to ensure that the exemptions were targeted to small businesses. Not only was an exemption created that allowed unlimited sums to be raised without any disclosure whatsoever, but the same exemption allowed that money to be raise from an unlimited number of wealthy investors.

With Regulation D a new era in U.S. finance was born.[6] The 1980s saw private equity funds take off along with leveraged buyouts, see Chart 1. The economic inefficiencies created by leveraged buyouts were immediately recognized (e.g. Shleifer and Summers 1988), but apparently no connection was drawn linking the growth of these funds and their economically inefficient activities to the lifting of the ’33 Act’s limitations on private fundraising by securities issuers.

pe funds.pdf

Even though Regulation D made it much easier for investment funds to raise money without disclosure, most funds did not want to register under the ’40 Act and as a result in order to qualify for the 3(c)(1) exemption the number of investors was capped at 100. It was not until 1996 that the National Securities Markets Improvement Act created a new exemption from registration under the ‘40 Act. Section 3(c)(7) funds are permitted an unlimited number of investors as long as they are “qualified purchasers,” a category which includes individuals with $5 million in investments and institutional investors with at least $25 million in assets under management.[7] Legislative history indicates that Congress deemed these investors to be capable of evaluating “on their own behalf matters such as the level of a fund’s management fees, governance provisions, transactions with affiliates, investment risk, leverage, and redemption rights” (S. Rep. No. 104-293). In other words, as the SEC explained “Congress determined that the amount of a person’s investments should be used to measure a person’s financial sophistication” (2015: 25).

Thus, after 1996 we see once again a significant acceleration in growth of private funds, see Chart 2.

hedge funds

Data from: Joenvaara, Kosowski, & Tolonen (2012). For hedge fund AUM over time, see here.

 

This unregulated environment fostered certain decades-long frauds like that perpetrated by Bernie Madoff and insider trading as took place at SAC Capital. The remarkable window that has been opened into one wealthy family’s activities by the Mueller investigation naturally raises the question of the degree to which these underreporting investment funds are systematically breaking the law on the principle that they are very unlikely to ever be caught doing so.

The wrongdoing that has been uncovered is entirely consistent with the wrongdoing that the Investment Company Act was designed to prevent. Six years before the Act was passed the Pecora Committee Report discussed the problem of investment trusts:

“laissez fair policy nurtured a mushroom propagation of investment trusts of incalculable economic significance. The investment company became the instrumentality of financiers and industrialists to facilitate acquisition of concentrated control of the wealth and industries of the country. The investment trust was the vehicle employed by individuals to enhance their personal fortunes in violation of their trusteeship, to the financial detriment of the public. Conflicts of duty and interest existing between managers of the investment trusts and the investing public were resolved against the investor. The consequences of these management trusts have been calamitous to the Nation. … the exposure of the abuses and evils of investment trusts must be expeditiously translated into legislative action to prevent recurrence of these practices” (S. Rep. 73-1455: 333).

In the event Congress moved with much more deliberation than Senator Pecora demanded. The newly created SEC was tasked with studying the problem, and the law was developed in close consultation with the investment industry. As a result, the final bill was sent to Congress with the full support of the both the SEC and the investment industry, leading a prominent legal scholar to remark that “the passage of such comprehensive legislation with virtually no debate is probably without precedent” (Jaretski 1941: 310-11). In short, the Investment Company Act was carefully designed to work to the benefit of the financial industry by improving its operation. While the term asymmetric information had not yet been coined, contemporary Congressional reports on the Act make it clear that that the law was carefully targeted to address information problems. To quote from the Senate Report on the Act:

“The representatives of the investment trust industry were of the unanimous opinion that ‘self-dealing’ – that is, transactions between officers, directors, and similar persons and the investment companies with which they are associated – presented opportunities for gross abuse by unscrupulous persons, through unloading of securities upon the companies, unfair purchases from the companies, the obtaining of unsecured or inadequately secured loans from the companies, etc. The industry recognized that, even for the most conscientious managements, transactions between these affiliated persons and the investment companies present many difficulties. Many investment companies have voluntarily barred this type of transaction. …

“Finally, particularly with respect to those companies which have not registered their securities under the Securities Act of 1933 or the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, and only a small number has so registered its securities, the investor has been unable to obtain adequate information as to their operations. The accounting practices and financial reports to stockholders of management investment companies frequently are deficient and inadequate in many respects and ofttimes are misleading. In many cases, dividends have been declared and paid without informing the stockholders that such dividends represented not earning but a return of capital to stockholders.” (S. Rpt. No 76-1775: 8).

Currently in the US hedge funds have $4 trillion in assets under management and private equity funds have $2.5 trillion (SEC Private Fund Statistics Q1 2018). As the total assets of the U.S. commercial banking system are a little less than $17 trillion, we find that the funds in the US that are not subject to standard controls on the use and abuse of asymmetric information are equivalent in size to one-third of the banking system. In short, one driver of financialization and the inequality associated with it is the vast quantity of underregulated investment funds that hide in the shadows of the US financial system.

It’s worth mentioning that the 1980s and 1990s also witnessed the proliferation of business forms that offer limited liability without either corporate status or corporate taxation. The limited liability company or LLC is the foremost of these structures, and plays a part in the development of a vast financial system that hides in the shadows of the regulated financial system. Many hedge funds are structured as LLCs.

Prior to 1988 the only business structure that combined pass-through taxation with limited liability was the S-corporation. The Chapter S election is available only to small corporations with no more than 100 shareholders,[8] all of whom are individuals. In 1988 the IRS granted the LLC structure the “pass through” tax status that makes it such a useful tool for structuring and hiding assets. By 1996 LLC statutes had been enacted in every state. A variety of other limited liability business structures that have pass through taxation are also available now.

Overall, a vast swathe of the US financial system operates in the dark with minimal supervision even today. That this situation was allowed to develop in the name of financing “small business” is astounding.

An adjustment should be made in our understanding of the purpose of our financial regulatory laws: The deployment of hundreds of millions of dollars in funds has public implications. For this reason alone, all investment companies with assets under management in excess of $500 million and either at least one pension fund investor (and thus hundreds of beneficial investors) or more than 35 investors should be subject to the Securities Act’s reporting requirements.

[1] SEC v. Ralston Purina, 346 U.S. 119 (1953).

[2] Rule 146 stated that the Section 4(a)(2) exemption would apply if:
(i)            Offerings were limited to 35 purchasers;
(ii)           Offerees had access to or were furnished with information comparable to what a registration statement would contain;
(iii)          Issuers reasonably believed that all offerees either (a) had the requisite knowledge and experience in financial matters to evaluate the risks of the investment or (b) could bear the economic risks of the investment;
(iv)          Sales were made only to those who had the requisite knowledge and experience or who had a representative who was capable of providing the requisite knowledge and experience;
(v)           There was no general advertising or solicitation.

[3] The Dodd Frank Act, Section 413(a) caused the value of a primary residence to be excluded from the measure of net worth.

[4] In 1988 the Commission’s position that a $150,000 investment guaranteed that the investor had sufficient “bargaining power” that no protection was needed was reconsidered “particularly at the $150,000 level” and this criterion for accredited investor status was withdrawn entirely (SEC 2015: 17-18).

[5] The crude model of capital formation underlying this approach is remarkable coming from an agency that was created in order to address problems of information asymmetry. Afterall, it is investor protections that safeguard the economy’s long-term capacity to raise capital.

[6] This growth has been attributed to other causes such as anti-takeover statutes or high yield bonds, but the timing doesn’t line up for these. High yield bonds began to take off as an asset class in the 1970s. And when the Supreme Court struck down an anti-takeover statute in 1982, it was far from clear that this would invalidate the statutes that had been enacted in other states, and indeed in 1987 the Supreme Court upheld an anti-takeover statute – and leveraged buyouts continued to boom.

[7] Note that in order to avoid registration under Section 12(g) of the ’34 Act, most funds today limit their investors to 499.

[8] In the original law only 35 shareholders were permitted.

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What drives low corporate investment?

The Economist asks “What explains the rise in corporate thrift?”  I think the question needs to be more carefully defined.  To what degree is the “rise in corporate thrift” driven by the hoarding of cash and to what degree by an effort to reduce the overwhelming burden of debt?  When firms are observed “hoarding cash”, is this a reflection of a movement of their financial investment portfolios into cash or a genuine decision to reduce internal investment?  Sharpening the question via a more careful breakdown of firm behavior would improve the quality of the discussion.

Another factor that needs to be considered is whether we are talking about the decline in corporate investment over the last decade or so or the more recent jump in corporate savings.  While the Economist is clearly addressing the recent rise in corporate savings due to the crisis, Yves Smith and Rob Parenteau have an op-ed in the NYT that looks at longer term trends in corporate investment.  Their thesis that “incentives for both managers and investors now favor myopia and speculation, undermining the very operation of capitalism” merits further analysis.